Citizens don't trust government with personal data

Nine out of 10 adults in the UK don't trust the government with their personal data, an online survey has revealed.

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Nine out of 10 adults in the UK don't trust the government with their personal data, an online survey has revealed.

Yet the survey of over 1,000 people, conducted by IT security supplier Data Encryption Systems (DES), found that 74 percent were willing to share personal information with banks, employers and friends.

The level of trust in the government, at 10 percent, is just one percentage point higher than trust in online retailers.

DES managing director David Tomlinson said, "With the increasing dependence on IT and the rise of identity theft, data protection is no longer just a problem for the CIO, but something everyone has to consider."

Despite this, 41 percent were in favour of having ID cards in the UK, 40 percent were against, and 19 percent undecided.

Of respondents who said they opposed ID cards, 72 percent said they did not trust the government to protect their personal data. Among these, 93 percent said this was because of the government's poor track record of looking after data.

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