Janet offers public WiFi network to higher education sector

Janet, the college network and technology provider, has partnered with WiFi operator The Cloud to offer public WiFi deals to the higher and further education sector.

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Janet, the college network and technology provider, has partnered with WiFi operator The Cloud to offer public WiFi deals to the higher and further education sector.

The agreement will allow institutions connected to the Janet network to deliver public access WiFi to guests who wish to get online whilst on campus at universities or colleges across the UK.

The service, said Janet, will run separately to student WiFi services in these institutions, enhancing the experience of guest lecturers, visitors, students’ families and prospective students by providing fast connectivity during their visit.

Janet serves over 18 million end-users in UK research and education. By partnering with The Cloud, Janet can offer universities and colleges "significant savings", it said, by utilising existing infrastructure and by reducing management overheads and support costs.

Educational establishments are increasingly holding events outside of regular term, such as guest lectures, conferences or corporate events, so the ability to offer visitors WiFi is a commonly sought-after service, Janet said.

The solution offered by The Cloud not only takes care of all the regulatory requirements, but as a turnkey or “off-the-shelf” offering, it can be deployed quickly, and allows institutions to scale WiFi capacity up or down, making use of existing Janet infrastructure to cater for events which see an influx of visitors.

“There’s a growing demand from our community for the ability to provide a public WiFi offering. This sentiment has been reiterated countless times,” said Tim Marshall, Jisc executive director for technology and infrastructure and divisional CEO for Janet.

“Being able to offer an externally managed end user WiFi service means our customers can provide a product without having to worry about the complexities of running two different WiFi networks,” he said.