USB speeds to be boosted to 10Gbps with new 3.1 standard

The consortium responsible for the USB has approved a new standard that promises to make the memory sticks quicker.

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The consortium responsible for the USB has approved a new standard that promises to make the memory sticks quicker.

The 3.1 specification will deliver data transfer speeds of 10Gbps while also expressing backwards compatibility for USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 devices.

The USB 3.0 consortium - which includes Microsoft, Intel and HP among others – said the 3.1 standard will also offer “more efficient data encoding and […] twice the effective data through-put performance of existing SuperSpeed USB”.

Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports were launched in the late 1990s as part of an attempt to standardise how accessories are connected to computers. The first versions of the USB achieved speeds of 12Mbits.

The most recent USB upgrade to 3.0 was carried out in 2008 and branded SuperSpeed, with speeds of 4Gbps. The new standard, which promises to deliver speeds up to 6Gbps faster, will be known as SuperSpeed+.

“In this multi-device world, the USB 3.1 updates will enable end-users to move content across devices quickly, conveniently and without worrying about compatibility,” said AMD’s corporate vice president of Platform Solutions Engineering, Emile Ianni.

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