TimesTen comes of age

Oracle has released the first version of its TimesTen in-memory database developed completely in-house since buying TimesTen in 2005.

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Oracle has released the first version of its TimesTen in-memory database developed completely in-house since buying TimesTen in 2005.

The first major version of the TimesTen emphasising increased integration and caching with its enterprise-level Oracle Database 10g.

The previous version of the database, Release 6, which appeared in late September 2005, was almost in beta testing when Oracle purchased TimesTen, according to Jim Groff, senior vice president at Oracle, and the former chief executive of TimesTen.

One main use of TimesTen is as a front-end data cache for Oracle 10g, Groff said. The software can store a subset of the vast amount of data held in the back-end 10g database in memory as part of a company's middleware layer, where it can be accessed more quickly than querying the entire enterprise database. The rapid access to information can significantly boost the response times of applications.

All the new functionality in TimesTen 7 is related to Oracle 10g, but the vendor could offer the same capabilities to support third-party databases, Groff said. Some TimesTen customers, particularly on in the financial services, use rival databases from Sybase and IBM to connect to the in-memory database.

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