Survey: Microsoft may catch Apache in web server market

Microsoft's Internet Information Services (IIS) is closing in on the open-source Apache web server in terms of popularity, with a survey firm suggesting that it could surpass Apache as early as next year.

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Microsoft's Internet Information Services (IIS) is closing in on the open-source Apache web server in terms of popularity, with a survey firm suggesting that it could surpass Apache as early as next year.

Microsoft, which added 2.6 million web sites in the last month, now underpins 36.2% of all active web sites, according to figures released by research firm Netcraft. Apache lost nearly a million web site names, as its share of active web sites fell to 48.4%.

"If Microsoft continues to gain share at its current pace, it could close the gap on Apache sometime in 2008," said the Netcraft posting accompanying the survey results.

That's a major turnaround in two years. Apache has led the Netcraft survey since its inception in 1995. By November 2005 it was running 71% of all web sites. That gave Apache massive lead over IIS's 20.2% share, and caused commentators such as Oracle executive Larry Ellison to declare that IIS had been "wiped off the face of the earth" by Apache.

But Microsoft's recent gains have been so fast that furious open-source proponents such as Bruce Perens claimed last year that Microsoft was paying large domain name resellers such as Go Daddy to "park" unused domain names in IIS rather than Apache.

Perens, who set up a web site called OpenSourceParking.com for users to park their domain names on an Apache server to counter what he sees as Microsoft's attempts to manipulate mindshare, conceded that Apache's market share is declining, though he attributed it to the growing popularity of other open-source web servers such as lighttpd.

"Technology evolves," Perens said in an e-mail. But businesses that use IIS are bringing trouble upon themselves, he argues. "My own web server running Linux does not have a firewall, it's been on the internet for 10 years and has never needed one. Try running any MS operating system naked on the Net that way."

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