Spending on business continuity set to rise

Spending on business continuity is set to increase this year, a poll of IT directors and senior managers has found.

Share

Spending on business continuity is set to increase this year, a poll of IT directors and senior managers has found.

The survey of over 560 chief information officers, IT directors and IT managers in large and medium-sized businesses worldwide found that more than 80% saw business continuity as a priority for increased spending in 2007.

The senior IT managers identified disaster-tolerant systems, back-up and recovery, security and improved IT service management as other areas set for higher spending this year than in 2006.

But 18% of enterprises – and more than three out of 10 medium-sized businesses – lacked a business continuity plan, the survey commissioned by HP and conducted by GCR Custom Research revealed.

The IT managers cited obstacles to implementing business continuity plans ranging from problems with securing financial support or executive backing to technical difficulties.

But overall, the results showed a shift in strategy for many companies, from a reactive approach to disaster recovery to longer-term business continuity planning.

Bill Crichton, consultancy manager (EMEA) for business continuity and recovery services at HP, said: “In today’s global marketplace, any amount of downtime can be devastating, if not terminal, to a business. Research shows that IT decision makers see a dramatic return on investment as a result of building a sound, long-term, holistic business continuity plan, which will ultimately reduce the impact of internal or external threats.”

But earlier this month, the Chartered Management Institute warned that companies were paying “lip service” to business continuity planning but not making resilience a reality.

The CMI’s 2007 Business Continuity Management Survey of more than 1,200 public and private sector managers found that 73% believed business continuity was seen as important by their senior management team – but more than half said they worked for organisations where there was no specific business continuity plan in place.

Find your next job with computerworld UK jobs