South east police forces sign £37.4m PSN deal with BT

The police and crime commissioners of three south east police forces have signed a shared network services contract with BT worth £37.4 million.

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The police and crime commissioners of three south east police forces have signed a shared network services contract with BT worth £37.4 million.

Thames Valley Police, Hampshire Constabulary and Surrey Police are covered by the South East Police Shared Network Services Agreement (SEPSNSA), which aims to "transform" their telecoms technology and save them money.

Overall savings of up to 20 percent are being promised through standardising technology and service models, enabling economies of scale and creating more cost-effective networks.

BT will provide the three forces with a secure regional Public Services Network (PSN). The Public Services Network is a UK government initiative to unify the provision of network infrastructure across the UK public sector, creating an interconnected "network of networks" to increase efficiency and reduce overall public expenditure.

BT will provide a local area network, wide area network, internet protocol telephony, contact centre technology, call recording and a variety of data security measures.

The forces will be able to connect and share information across a trusted data network for the south east region. BT will do this by securely connecting all data centres from the three forces. Users will have the ability to work from anywhere across the three forces instead of having to drive to key locations.

Police and crime commissioner (PCC) for Thames Valley Police, Anthony Stansfeld, said: "This is a great example of police Forces using their combined purchasing power to deliver significant savings for their force and enabling opportunities for closer working in the future."

Telecoms project management firm Analysys Mason was brought in by the forces to help with the BT contract.

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