Scottish Life halves IT running costs with infrastructure shake-up

Life assurance and pensions firm Scottish Life has halved its IT operating costs after ditching its mainframe in an overhaul of its infrastructure.

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Life assurance and pensions firm Scottish Life has halved its IT operating costs after ditching its mainframe in an overhaul of its infrastructure.

Scottish Life, part of the Royal London Group, has moved its core legacy applications from a Unisys Clearpath mainframe to a more open hardware and software environment, in a project undertaken with migration specialist MSS International.

Scottish Life began the migration and infrastructure overhaul because its mainframe environment was struggling to handle an increasing number of life and pension business transactions.

It has now replaced the Unisys mainframe with 12 HP servers running Unix and used application modernisation technology from Micro Focus to improve the speed of its applications.

Ian Chapple, chief information officer at the Royal London Group, said: “The total cost of running the systems over the next five years is less than half that of the Unisys mainframe solution proposed at the time. It has been a very successful project and has provided a huge return on investment.”

Relations between the Royal London Group and Unisys have had a troubled history. In 2001, the two firms settled a court case brought by the insurance group after the failure of a £14m IT project to develop a bespoke insurance administration system.

The settlement – with undisclosed terms – followed lengthy wrangling by the two sides in court.

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