Retail giant promises to go green

Retail giant, Marks & Spencer (M&S), has said it will stop dumping IT equipment in landfill sites as part of an initiative to make the company greener.

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Retail giant, Marks & Spencer (M&S), has said it will stop dumping IT equipment in landfill sites as part of an initiative to make the company greener.

UK businesses have to dispose of their electronic equipment without damaging the environment according the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive. All IT departments have to comply with these regulations by July this year.

“Every business and individual needs to do their bit to tackle the enormous challenges of climate change and waste” said M&S CEO Stuart Rose.

The move to stop using landfill sites is part of a larger a business-wide £200m “eco-plan” announced yesterday, to make the company more environmentally friendly. The company plans to be carbon neutral by 2012, overhauling its supply chain so that it doubles UK food sourcing within a year and grow our existing local supply networks. It will also work with its suppliers through the M&S Supplier Exchange to share best practice and mobilise them to reduce their carbon emissions

M&S wants to cut its CO2 emissions by 80 per cent – in line with the Stern Review’s target for British businesses. This will be equivalent to taking 100,000 cars off the road each year.

The company also plans to start generating its own green energy, by investing in anaerobic digesters – an industrial system that harnesses natural processes to treat food waste from its supermarkets, produce bio gas that can be used to power electricity generators.

The Company was unable to comment in detail about how it was going to dispose of its IT or issues surrounding energy efficiency of its datacentres. “This is an ambitious five year plans, and we will be announcing specific details of projects over the coming months,” said M&S spokesperson Clare Wilkes.

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