Microsoft and Red Hat reach virtualisation deal

Microsoft and Red Hat have agreed to support each other's virtualisation products in a move that indicates how import cross-platform support is expected to be within virtualised environments.

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Microsoft and Red Hat have agreed to support each other's virtualisation products in a move that indicates how import cross-platform support is expected to be within virtualised environments.

Under the terms of the deal, outlined in blog posts by Microsoft senior open source community manager Peter Galli and Microsoft Virtualisation General Manager Mike Neil, both companies will validate and offer customer support for each other's OSes on their virtualisation technologies.

Specifically, Microsoft will offer customer support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 and 5.3 guests on all editions of Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V and Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008. For its part, Red Hat will support customers running Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows 2000 Server SP4 and Windows Server 2008 guests on Red Hat Enterprise virtualisation technologies.

The companies also will offer cooperative technical support for customers running Windows Server on Red Hat Enterprise virtualisation and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V. Future versions of these products also will be validated under the company's agreement.

Stephen O'Grady, an analyst with open-source research firm RedMonk, said the deal underscored how even competitors have to cross party lines to support virtualisation, which is becoming an integral part of data centres that, more often than not, include both Windows- and Linux-based servers.

Virtualisation allows companies to cut costs in their IT environments by allowing more than one OS on a physical server by running software in virtualised containers. The technology allows a customer to run applications on both Linux and Windows on one piece of hardware.

O'Grady noted that support for enterprise applications still hinges on what OS an application is running on. "If you talk to application vendors, their support depends on an application platform," he said. "They'll support the app on Windows, on RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux), but that's as far as that goes."

Because software can be running on one virtualised OS - RHEL, for instance - that runs physically on a server running another OS, such as Windows, it's important for customers to know that both Red Hat and Microsoft will support them in such a scenario, O'Grady said.

"If I'm running RHEL virtualised on top of Windows, I need to make sure I'm supported commercially on every step of the way," he said. "Virtualisation pushes the boundaries of support and requires that vendors work well and effectively together."

There is no love lost between Microsoft and Red Hat, which have traded barbs for years as fierce competitors with fundamentally different views of how software should be developed and distributed. This may explain why the companies chose to unveil the pact - their most significant and public partnership to date -- on a public holiday in the US when many people had the day off from work. Companies typically will release news they hope will be overlooked by major news outlets on public holidays.