Met Police set to overhaul surveillance and security control

The Metropolitan Police has unveiled plans to overhaul its security systems, having faced recent criticism for outdated IT and surveillance technology.

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The Metropolitan Police has unveiled plans to overhaul its security systems, having faced recent criticism for outdated IT and surveillance technology.

An online tender details a £44 million framework, which is divided into three separate lots, covering a wide variety of surveillance and control room technologies.

Access control systems, digital and IP security systems, digital mapping systems, digital video systems, and CCTV systems using proprietary and bespoke software are amongst the Met’s technology requirements.

A scathing report recently released by the London Assembly’s Budget and Performance Committee stated that crime is higher in London as a direct result of the Met’s outdated technology and IT systems.

It found that it currently spends approximately 85 percent of its £250 million annual ICT budget on just running and maintaining its technology.

A separate Scotland Yard report released last year also said that the Met's control room IT is so outdated that the force was unable to see the latest situation on the ground during London’s 2011 summer riots.

It said that commanders “have no simple way to view the latest situation in an evolving incident” on the MetOps system, which was introduced in the 1980s.

Those interested in participating in the tender process have until 4 November to submit their applications to the Met. Suppliers will be responsible for the supply, installation, support and maintenance of all of the systems, and it is expected that the framework will last for four years once live.

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