IT chiefs fear investment in new technologies

More than three out of five IT leaders admit they are reluctant to invest in cutting edge technologies, new research has shown.

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More than three out of five IT leaders admit they are reluctant to invest in cutting edge technologies, new research has shown.

A survey of 100 UK IT directors and chief information officers from firms with more than 1,000 staff found that 37% described themselves as “hesitant” to buy new technologies, while 19% said they were “averse” and another 5% were “nervous”.

Just 2% said they were “eager” to consider new technologies, the survey carried out by research firm Vanson Bourne for Fujitsu Siemens Computers found.

The survey revealed a likely reason for the IT leaders’ jitters: nearly a quarter of those surveyed said the biggest overall challenge when procuring newer technologies was convincing the board that it would be a safe investment. Winning executive buy-in was a particular worry in the financial services sector where three out of 10 of those surveyed said this would be the biggest hurdle.

IT directors across industry were also concerned that new technology could cause disruption to business users (19%) and worried about overcoming budget constraints (14%).

Steve Kendall-Smith managing director of Fujitsu Siemens Computers UK operation said: “Corporate IT departments have come such a long way over the past 20 years. Right the way from the back-office and into the forefront of an organisation – helping to gain competitive edge.

“But now, as the IT systems they’ve built up over the years begin to creak, it will take people with the necessary ambition and nerve to address the task of replacing them with cutting-edge alternatives.”

The survey also revealed that more than two-thirds of IT leaders wanted to remain in their IT-focused role, with only 16% aspiring to a chief executive or chief operations officer post.

Among the IT leaders polled, 5% wanted to downshift to “less stressful” or “less corporate” environments in the next five years.

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