HMRC manually processing 16 million PAYE accounts

HMRC is manually wading through a backlog of over 16 million pay as you earn tax accounts, after continued delays to the launch of a centralised PAYE system, which will replace 1980s software.

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HMRC is manually wading through a backlog of over 16 million pay as you earn tax accounts, after continued delays to the launch of a centralised PAYE system, which will replace 1980s software.

The backlog has mushroomed from a government target of an already staggering 10.5 million cases requireing manual intervention at the end of March 2008.

The new Modernising PAYE Processes for Customers system, also known as the National Insurance Recording system, aims to replace the increasingly ineffective legacy system.

But last July it emerged that the launch had been delayed because HMRC decided the system did not have enough capacity. It could not effectively process information on people with multiple jobs, or those who regularly changed jobs. The rollout will now commence this spring.

HMRC had “significantly underestimated the volume of processing required”, the Committee of Public Accounts, the powerful group of MPs that scrutinises government spending, said in a new report.

As a result of the planning errors, by March last year sixteen million cases needed to be manually checked, the committee said.

In 2007 to 2008, HMRC collected £127 billion in income tax and £98 billion in national insurance through the systems, but a backlog of case queries built up as the existing systems do not offer a single view of individuals working for multiple employers.

The committee urged HMRC to develop a proper strategy to reduce the number of cases in the queue, and to ensure that the transfer of information to the new system did not in itself significantly worsen the situation.

“A strategy to eliminate this backlog should be established and implemented with all speed,” Edward Leigh, chairman of the committee, said upon publication of the ‘Tax Credits and Income Tax’ report. The backlog would otherwise be “set to worsen”, he said.

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