Google shows off Android capabilities

Google has delivered an eye-catching demonstration of an early Android-enabled mobile phone at the Google I/O conference in San Francisco.

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Google's eye-catching demonstration of an early Android-enabled mobile phone Wednesday appeared to mimic Apple's iPhone.

It showed an Android device, featuring touch screen functionality, advanced graphical capabilities and Internet access, similar to iPhone. With Android, the company seeks to extend the browser to handheld devices, a capability currently limited to systems such as iPhone, said Vic Gundotra, Google engineering vice president.

"We believe over time, the browser on mobile devices will be the entry point for many, many applications," Gundotra said.

Android, though, does not represent Google's countermove against the iPhone, Gundotra argued.

"I wouldn't say that at all. I think the iPhone is just a world-class device with a great Web browser that delivers in many respects on one of Google's key goals: To bring the Web to the mobile device," Gundotra said. "We wish every mobile phone was as good as the iPhone."

The first Android systems are due in the second half of this year, with an Android SDK available now that uses Java development tools. Android also relies on Apple's open-source WebKit browser engine.
The audience was shown a view of a street from an Android system as well as a demonstration of the Pac-Man video game. Users also can add icons to the screen, such as a New York Times icon to access news.

Additionally, Android features capabilities like an unlock pattern for security and a status bar enabling access to missed calls, for example. Shortcuts can be enabled to applications such as Gmail and music and contact lists. Applications written for WebKit-enabled phones can work out of the box.

Also highlighted were zooming capabilities, a compass mode, site navigation, and access to Google Maps.

The Android demonstration made an impact on a developer in the audience who previously was not interested in the project.

"The Android [demonstration] did look really interesting to me, and that was actually something that I wasn't interested but after this, yes, I definitely am interested in it," said developer Chad Crandall, who also is a student at Arizona State University. "It appears to be making a single platform for all the mobile Web applications, and that's something we all need."

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