EUROVISION moves to Colt media network to cut costs by 20%

EUROVISION, the distributor and producer of live sports, news and music to the media industry, says it has reduced fibre networking costs by 20 percent a year by moving to Colt’s Optimum Managed Networking service.

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As well as making savings, the move is said to have quadrupled EUROVISION’s bandwidth capacity, helping the organisation meet the increasing challenge for on-demand, high-quality live content.

The slightest delay or inconsistency in live event transmission can badly affect viewing experiences and be commercially damaging for broadcasters, especially those charging a premium for sports subscriptions.

While EUROVISION says it has continued to innovate as fast, low-cost fibre has increasingly replaced satellite for live transmissions wherever practicable, the growth in bandwidth-hungry high-definition formats had put pressure on its existing network.

"We always need to take advantage of the latest in broadcast-quality network technology to remain competitive," said Graham Warren, network director at EUROVISION. “When you operate the world’s largest media contribution network, carrying 45,000 hours of live sports programming and over 80,000 hours of total content transmission every year, there is no room for error. The decision to embark on a network upgrade was major one.”

Having assessed potential suppliers for its European fibre network, EUROVISION chose to migrate to Colt's pan-European broadcast quality Ethernet infrastructure. EUROVISION can now use Colt’s 10Gbps video transport capability, as well as respond to developments such as ultra-high definition TV, second-screen services and the growth in remote production.

Additionally, Colt’s end-to-end control of its European network simplifies network management, giving greater visibility to EUROVISION over planned maintenance, as well as a faster response to unforeseen issues.

Warren said: "Colt’s services provide us with the reliability, capacity and flexibility we need to meet both our current and future needs for high-definition transmission."

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