Emulex sues Broadcom to block takeover

Emulex has taken its efforts to avoid a hostile takeover by Broadcom to court, suing the company for unfair business practices.

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Emulex has taken its efforts to avoid a hostile takeover by Broadcom to court, suing the company for unfair business practices.

It also cited the drug-trafficking and securities-fraud indictment of Broadcom's former top executive as evidence to its shareholders that Broadcom officials may not be trusted.

The move is the latest by Emulex to fend off Broadcom, which has been trying to purchase Emulex since late last year and recently took its $9.25-a-share offer directly to Emulex's shareholders in a tender offer.

Emulex claimed that shareholders should be wary of Broadcom's offer because it has not fully disclosed information relating not only to statements it's made about its offer to purchase Emulex but also about former CEO and cofounder Henry Nicholas' alleged criminal activities, according to documents filed in an Orange County, California, Superior Court.

Nicholas, who served as CEO, president and co-chairman of Broadcom's board from 1991 until early 2003, is awaiting trial - set for next February - on drug-trafficking and securities fraud charges. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Despite his situation and his resignation from Broadcom, Nicholas continues to be involved in Broadcom's business affairs, including interviewing and selecting current CEO Scott McGregor and current board members, Emulex claimed in its 60-page court filing.

In a statement, Emulex said the suit "speaks for itself" and that its stockholders, while considering Broadcom's tender offer, should be "fully and fairly informed about the history of the company."

In a statement, Broadcom characterized Emulex's escalation of the bad blood between the two companies as "mud slinging and scorched-Earth tactics" designed to block what Broadcom believes is a good offer to buy Emulex.