Eclipse foundation set for bumper open source project release

The Eclipse Foundation is today pushing out its annual release of technologies from different open source project teams covering everything mobiles to SOA to the base Eclipse platform.

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The Eclipse Foundation is today pushing out its annual release of technologies from different open source project teams covering everything mobiles to SOA to the base Eclipse platform.

Each June since 2004, the release train has grown from two projects initially to 23 projects last year, and now, 33 project teams as part of a release train dubbed "Galileo." The full list of projects comes out to 38 projects, with some teams handling multiple projects. Upgrades and new projects are featured.

"It's definitely larger, 33 projects and 23 million lines of code," said Ian Skerrett, Eclipse director of marketing. While end-users can download the projects to use themselves, a key goal of Eclipse is for commercial companies to take the base Eclipse technologies and add enhancements of their own.

With the single release train, users can upgrade projects at the same time, said Skerrett. All told, Eclipse is working on 100 projects, including some not in Galileo, such as Eclipse Pulsar project to provide unity in application development for mobile systems.

Key projects in Galileo include the 1.0 version of the Swordfish SOA runtime, serving as an enterprise service bus, and the 3.5 release of the base Eclipse Platform.

The base technology features the Java IDE, a workbench and the core OSGi runtime, which adds support for the Mac on the Cocoa platform and also supports Solaris 10. Eclipse Platform is a subproject of Eclipse Project.

Also featured in Galileo is version 2.1 of the PHP Development Tools Project, which backs PHP 5.3 and its capabilities such as namespaces and anonymous functions. Xtext, a new project also identified as Textual Modeling Framework, enables modeling of DSLs (domain-specific languages).

"This is very similar what Microsoft is trying to do with [its Oslo project] and its M language," said Skerrett.

"What a DSL allows you to do is define a higher-level abstraction that allows developers to focus on smaller subsets in a specific problem domain," such as pharmaceuticals, Skerrett said.

Also, the Eclipse Equinox project in Galileo is supporting OSGi 4.2.

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