Crime bill measure may not deter cyber crime

New measures to crack down on serious cyber crime are not enough without the resources to enforce them a partner at KPMG Forensics has warned.

Share

New measures to crack down on serious cyber crime are not enough without the resources to enforce them a partner at KPMG Forensics has warned.

Proposals to combat fraud through greater controlled data sharing within the public sector, and between the private and public sectors were set out yesterday as the Home Office published the Serious Crime Bill.

But Jeremy Outen, partner at KPMG Forensic says the measures need to be accompanied by proper resourcing from government and investment in training for police investigators.

“I welcome these powers, but in terms of implementing them there is going to need to be a huge investment in the data analytical and financial investigation skills to make the most of them,” said Outen.

“There needs to be a change of attitude on the part of law enforcement, and certainly a serious upskilling in the areas of financial investigation and using technology effectively.”

“By adding more and more powers – because every year there is another round – you are compensating for the lack of skilled resource to enact them. The more pressing problem is getting the resource.

He also believes there should be training for police investigators. “The point is there is a number of cases that I’ve been involved investigating and prosecuting where the techniques that organisations are using to move their assets around and legitimise them, are pretty complex and there is actually quite a bit of sophistication needed as an investigator to track it down and investigate, make the case and get the assets back.”

He also thinks the government should look to the private sector for best practice. “I think [the government] are a bit behind the private sector in terms of people and the investment in terms of hardware and software.

The wide range of possible cyber frauds, together with under-reporting, makes it difficult to form a comprehensive picture of the scale

“There are a number of estimates out there, but what is certain is that it’s a very big number, that is measured in tens billions and the amounts being recovered now, are measured in the hundred millions. So we are quite a long way short of undermining the criminal e-economy”

Find your next job with computerworld UK jobs