Bit.ly signs up Websense, VeriSign, Sophos to protect users

Bit.ly is embracing the Websense ThreatSeeker Cloud to help protect users from spam, phishing and malware.

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bit.ly, a URL shortening service for Web 2.0 sites and micro-blogging services such Twitter has teamed with Websense, the Internet, data and email security specialists, to help cut spam, phishing and malware amongst users.

Websense will analyse the web content behind bit.ly links in real time, using heuristic tools and reputation data to flag spammy URLs, malicious content and phishing sites.

The Websense ThreatSeeker Cloud will be used by the popular URL shortening service.

"bit.ly is one of the largest sharing services on the Web, with millions of shortened URLs created every day," said Andrew Cohen, bit.ly's general manager.

"A large part of our success is due to the trust users have in our service and we work hard to earn that trust by warning our users about spam and malicious content."

In October, bit.ly shortened more than two billion links. By the end of the year bit.ly plans to begin processing millions of existing and newly created shortened links through the Web API of the Websense ThreatSeeker Cloud daily.

"With the Websense security-as-a-service API powering our security intelligence, we will be able to better serve our customers and enable their use of Web 2.0 social media technology while protecting them from the latest threats," Cohen added.

In addition to providing security and classification intelligence to bit.ly users, users will now be able to report spam to [email protected] and have their feedback become part of the classification and threat protection for all Websense subscribers.

bit.ly will also embrace VeriSign’s iDefense IP reputation service and Sophos to help protect users.

"Spam sucks. That’s why we’ll be integrating three new services over the next few weeks, to extend the current spam and malware protection we offer to our users." the company said in a blog post.

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