Verne Global opens dual-sourced, renewable energy powered data centre

Green datacentre start up Verne Global has launched its 100 percent dual-sourced, renewable energy-powered data centre in Keflavik, Iceland - with initial customers including managed service providers, a major games company and a green cloud provider.

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Green datacentre start up Verne Global has launched its 100 percent dual-sourced, renewable energy-powered data centre in Keflavik, Iceland - with initial customers including managed service providers, a major games company and a green cloud provider.

Verne Global, which has installed a modular data centre from Colt in four months, was also given significant boost when Colt announced it was extending its European network into Iceland with a new Point-of-Presence (PoP) located at the Verne Global site.

The new PoP means that customers using the Verne Global site can expect data transmission standards that meet Colt's well established Europe-wide service level agreements.

Initial customers include CCP Games, an Iceland-based company with a $65m annual turnover and Datapipe, a US-based manage service provider and GreenQloud, which offers hosting and storage for the European and North American markets.

CCP Games will be putting its back office and development operations into the Verne Global datacentre. Its online games operations will continue to be run from a London Docklands data centre.

"Being able to select a green data centre for our corporate hosting needs is a key benefit to CCP Games," said Ingvar Bjarnason, CCP's IT Director. "However, the primary reasons for selecting Verne Global above all other alternative sites were the availability and predictability of power and the option of securing long-term price guarantees at attractive price levels."

Datapipe intends to initially offer its Iceland presence as an ideal disaster recovery site for organisations with East coast US and European operations. With Iceland equidistant between the US and Europe, said Sean McAvan, EMEA VP, organisations could rationalise their existing DR operations. "We are running network tests with clients next week," he said.

McAvan echoed comments by Verne Global executives that network latency to Iceland should not be a problem for many operations. "There is no reason why organisations would not house some of their production operations here," he told ComputerworldUK. "We are using DR as to start the process rolling."

Isaac Kato, Verne Global chief financial officer, said that many organisations could comfortably locate between 60 percent and 80 percent of their apps in Iceland-based datacentres, without latency impacting their business. Iceland's geothermal and hydroelectric renewable energy sources allowed Verne Global to sign 20-year guaranteed cost energy contracts with Landsvirkjun, the state power company.

"We can offer a 60 percent TCO reduction over London and 50 percent over New York with greater cost visibility than you can get elsewhere," said Kato. He estimated that Iceland also offered a 40 percent saving on typical UK datacentre sites outside the London region.