Smaller businesses 'are not going green'

UK businesses are failing to implement even basic green actions in their IT departments, according to research released by Prefix IT.

Share

UK businesses are failing to implement even basic green actions in their IT departments, according to research released by Prefix IT.

While the majority (98%) believe that IT should play a role in reducing carbon emissions, only half of IT decision-makers liaise with other departments, such as facilities managers, when budgets are allocated. And less than a third (30%) of smaller firms say they have a green policy in place to reduce carbon emissions with simple steps such as an automatic shutdown of hardware at night or over weekends.

Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are also falling short of reducing energy usage, because IT management and facilities management do not communicate with each other, according to the Prefix research. The network and asset management tool supplier interviewed senior IT decision makers in the UK.

Only 20% of IT professionals link power costs to IT budgets, yet electricity costs are far higher in the long run than the purchase of a PC or server, said the vendor.

A significant 80% of respondents stated that proving return on investment (ROI) on IT purchases is important. Yet according to the research only 30% said they had considered offsetting software purchase costs against potential electricity cost savings.

Graeme Pitts-Drake, UK managing director of Prefix IT, said: “There’s a clear case of silo-mentality in operation in UK SMEs. By viewing operational costs holistically, many organisations could not only make significant financial savings, but improve business performance and serve corporate responsibility as well.”

Better communication between IT and the utility purchasing team to identify approaches to reducing energy consumption could lead to reduced costs and lower carbon emissions, according to Pitts-Drake.

Now take part in ourHow Green is your IT survey

Find your next job with computerworld UK jobs