Nokia CIO hails Web 2.0 and enterprise mobility

Nokia has embraced the use of consumer mobile devices in the enterprise and is increasingly making use of Web 2.0 tools, including blogs, wikis and social networking sites, according to the CIO of the mobile operator.

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Nokia has embraced the use of consumer mobile devices in the enterprise and is increasingly making use of Web 2.0 tools, including blogs, wikis and social networking sites, according to the CIO of the mobile operator.

But John Clarke, who is Nokia's CIO and senior vice president, said Web 2.0 and mobility were not yet natural partners and there was much still to be done.

Speaking at a Gartner event earlier this month, Clarke described the explosive growth of mobility as contributing towards today's "liquid professional workplace".

"The world is going mobile," said Clarke. It has taken just 10 years for the mobile industry to reach 3 billion subscribers, he added. Of these, 850 million devices are Nokia devices. "The number of mobile phones in the world exceeds the number of toothbrushes."

Further, these mobile devices are growing more powerful, with vaster memories and multiple functions such as internet connectivity, and are "invading the workplace".

"Most new recruits, part of Generation Y and the digital natives, will bring a multimedia mobile device into the enterprise," said Clarke.

Clarke also said Web 2.0 applications could provide enterprises with a real opportunity, as mobiles are becoming an essential intelligent media device for the end user.

Internally, Nokia has also embraced blogs and wikis as a management and collaboration tool, where employees and teams can "gather information and turn it into something meaningful".

Clarke also praised Facebook as a useful tool for enterprises. "New employees can bring Facebook to the enterprise, and bring all their contacts with them. Think about the way corporations use phonebooks today – new employees are given a blank phonebook tool to enter in their contacts." These traditional tools, according to Clarke, provide limited functionality for networking and reaching new contacts. "The old blank phonebook destroys the concept of social networking. Facebook, or the social phonebook, is an opportunity."

But Clarke said Web 2.0 applications still have a way to go before being ready for mobile devices. "The PC-based approach of Web 2.0 applications doesn't work for mobiles."

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