Green Britain Day: Efficient IT does not come at a premium

Green Britian Day, the day when the public is being encouraged to make small changes to their lifestyle for the good of the environment, finds many UK businesses are not doing enough to make their IT infrastructures more environmentally-friendly according to the IT industry.

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Green Britian Day, the day when the public is being encouraged to make small changes to their lifestyle for the good of the environment, many UK businesses are still not doing enough to make their IT infrastructures more environmentally-friendly according to the IT industry.

While EDF Energy, which has promoted the project, is fending off accusations of “greenwash”, IT suppliers claim that there still seems to be an apparent lack of education in many businesses about the cost-benefit of going green.

“People need to understand that green technology isn’t just an expensive box with reduced performance as in the case of green cars, and it isn’t a case of utterly replacing an entire infrastructure to produce unclear reductions in emissions,” said Chris Davies, general manager UK & Ireland, at networking company D-Link.

“Green technology when done properly doesn’t sacrifice anything in terms of features, functionality or performance. Organisations have to be educated that adopting green technology isn’t a case of making a virtuous sacrifice of productivity in order to appeal to an environmental agenda.”

According to IT service provider Morse many businesses can become greener by simply making their existing IT environment more efficient and through better monitoring of their energy usage.

Mark Nutt, general manager at Morse said, "Going green shouldn't mean that IT departments have to tear up the rule book and start from scratch. Instead, it can simply be a matter of making relatively small changes in order to increase efficiency, reducing energy use and carbon emissions.

“For example, IT departments can make large energy savings by optimising their IT infrastructure: this could be as complex as consolidating a data centre, or as simple as rearranging servers so that they are cooled more effectively.

“Any IT department worth its salt should be monitoring exactly how much energy it uses: only in this way can any push towards greener IT actually be measured. There is still a fair way to go: for example, currently 65% of organisations are uncertain of whether they can comply with carbon emissions legislation.”

“It is a case of taking steps and making a business more efficient and more competitive in the future. For example, using greener technology in networking means making products that last longer and offer better performance. As a result, they become more efficient and much more cost-effective. It is passing this understanding on to businesses and the population as a whole that will spur mass adoption,” added Chris Davies.

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