CIOs and other execs lament conflicting green rules

Nearly nine in 10 European firms see a conflict between the regulations set out by their national governments and the European Union, a survey has revealed.

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Nearly nine in ten European firms see a conflict between the regulations set out by national governments and the European Union, a survey has revealed.

And 89% view green compliance as a "financial burden", according to the research conducted by research firm Coleman Parkes. CIOs, chief operating officers and chief financial officers at 200 enterprises in the UK, France, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden were interviewed for the survey.

The spending on such compliance was as much as 5.7% of annual revenues on average, though in Germany compliance spending was as high as 9.2%.

Conflicts between national and European-wide legislation were in part responsible for the high costs, the survey indicated. Two thirds of those interviewed called for an EU-wide emissions rating measure to simplify compliance. Nearly all of those interviewed, 94%, felt business should be engaged in environmental discussions at a higher political level.

"There are already global standards for emissions registers, which are working well and the technology is available to build and run a rating system," said Nick Caplan, chief marketing officer at Logica CMG, the IT services firm that commissioned the research.

He added: "Currently each country is adopting a different set of regulations, applicable to different industries, pushing different technologies and different calculation methods. Introducing a harmonised and mandatory environmental rating system would negate this."

On 3 December, environmental charity Global Action Plan’s launched a research paper called “An Inefficient Truth”, based on survey results conducted by Computerworld UK and backed by Logicalis. The report, which was launched at the House of Commons, detailed the state of environmental awareness amongst the UK IT community and what steps are being taken to reduce IT's impact on the environment.

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