Is Google missing the enterprise social-networking revolution

Why is Google keeping quite on its plans to add Facebook-like features to its collaboration and communication business suite?

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Many collaboration software providers consider it essential to have an enterprise social-networking component in their suites, but Google, which shook up this market with its Web-hosted Apps product in 2006, stands out for lacking this capability.

IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Socialtext, Box.net and Jive Software, among others have responded to demand from CIOs and IT managers for enterprise social-networking capabilities in collaboration suites.

As has happened before with wikis, blogs and syndication feeds, the popularity of social networking among consumers has propelled it to the workplace, where employees have found great collaboration and communication benefits in Facebook-like systems designed for use in companies.

In fact, some collaboration vendors are already on their second iteration of their enterprise social-networking technologies, giving them microblogging capabilities popularized among consumers by Twitter.

With so much activity in this space, Google seems to be trailing and slow on the uptake, as Apps remains a suite centered on e-mail communications and document sharing, devoid of social-networking capabilities.

Asked whether Google plans to add enterprise social networking to Apps, a Google spokesman said that the company has no comment about the issue.

Traditionally, Google's enterprise products evolve out of its consumer services, so a ray of light for Apps administrators could be that the company isn't a social-networking neophyte.

Google has a consumer social-networking service called Orkut, which isn't as popular as Facebook or MySpace but has nonetheless a significant user base.

The company also lets holders of Google accounts create personal profiles, where they can put information about themselves and consolidate access to Google services. A Google profile acts as a user's presentation badge on Google products to other users.

Given that it runs Orkut and the Google profile service, it wouldn't seem too much of a stretch for Google to adapt the existing technology of these two products into an enterprise social-networking component for Google Apps. "I certainly see them going in that direction," said Forrester analyst Sheri McLeish.

Others are already further ahead, though. IBM's Lotus unit launched Connections in June of 2007. That enterprise social-networking product lets administrators set up employee profiles, communities, activity stream broadcasting, blogs, social bookmarking and, soon, wikis.

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