Why does DH and CfH commission reports they ignore?

It's not clear why the Department of Health and NHS Connecting for Health have, in these austere times  continue to have an habit of delaying the publication of independent reports they have commissioned. When the reports are eventually...

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It's not clear why the Department of Health and NHS Connecting for Health have, in these austere times  continue to have an habit of delaying the publication of independent reports they have commissioned. 

When the reports are eventually published, they respond publicly to criticisms in the reports by saying the findings are out of date. They use the word "historic" to describe the findings, as if they are Jurassic discoveries. Another habitual word is "unrepresentative". 

Thus the DH and CfH dismiss publicly - and in briefings to their ministers -  reports they have commissioned. These reports tend to be ones which raise questions about the feasibility of DH and CfH projects or programmes.

Three examples:

In March 2006 Ipsos Mori completed a report on its second survey of attitudes towards the National Programme for IT in the NHS.  Ipsos Mori's reseachers interviewed more than 1,100 NHS employees including doctors, nurses, IM&T Managers and administrators. 


http://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/poll.aspx?oItemId=278

Taxpayers paid about £1m for independent After Professor Trisha Greenhalgh and her team of researchers produced independent reports on the Summary Care Record and Healthspace, the  and    report which showed Healthspace to be a failure  The DH told EHI Primary Care that it was continuing to develop HealthSpace including improving the registration process for an advanced account.

In its full statement on the Greenhalgh report a DH spokesperson stated: "As set out in the July 2010 White Paper and expanded on within the current Information Revolution consultation, the aim is that patients and service users will be increasingly active participants in their care and will share decision making with their clinicians.

"HealthSpace gives patients’ access to their Summary Care Record online and enables secure communication between clinicians and patients. Our own research, conducted during 2009, showed that patients were keen to have access to their medical records as well as wanting medical updates and test results to be available online.

"The UCL research has produced a historical snapshot, rather than insight into patients' needs and expectations. HealthSpace continues to be developed in response to those aspirations and the commitment to give patients, as well as clinicians, access to their Summary Care Record."

**



This is the response we have issued around the UCL research on Healthspace led by Trish Greenhalgh. The second paragraph of this answers your first question. a)

Department of Health spokesman said:

"As set out in the July 2010 White Paper and expanded on within the current Information Revolution consultation, the aim is that patients and service users will be increasingly active participants in their care and will share decision making with their clinicians. Healthspace gives patients access to their Summary Care Record online and enables secure communication between clinicians and patients.

Our own research, conducted during 2009, showed that patients were keen to have access to their medical records as well as wanting medical updates and test results to be available online. The UCL research has produced a historical snapshot, rather than insight into patients' needs and expectations. Healthspace continues to be developed in response to those aspirations and the commitment to give patients, as well as clinicians, access to their Summary Care Record."

We will get back to you asap regarding your other questions.

Regards, Briony

Briony Bowen
Media Relations Manager - Informatics
Department of Health
020 7004 1507




                                                                           
             "Tony Collins                                                 
             (tonyrcollins)"                                               
             <[email protected]                                          To 
             s.co.uk>                  Briony Bowen/OIS/[email protected]            
                                                                        cc 
             19/11/2010 09:47          <[email protected]>        
                                                                   Subject 
                                       urgent question                     
                                                                           
                                                                           
                                                                           
                                                                           
                                                                           
                                                                           





Briony

3 urgent questions:

The DH response to the Greenhalgh Healthspace report (reported below) appears to dismiss the report.

a)Does CfH/DH  attach any importance at all to the Greenhalgh report on Healthspace?

b) Does CfH/DH ever take any serious notice of  reports they have paid for which challenge the feasibility of, or the management of, CfH/DH projects and programmes, such as Healthspace?

c) What is the point of taxpayers paying for research reports such as the one on Healthspace if they have no influence on CfH/DH?


My deadline is noon

Thank you


Tony

From E-Health insider


In response the Department of Health told EHI Primary Care that the research had produced “a historical snapshot rather than insight into patients’ needs and expectations.” The DH said it was continuing to develop HealthSpace to meet patients' aspirations and to give patients access to their SCR.

**

Tony
here is the Department of Health spokesperson response in relation to the questions you put earlier:

"We commission research to help provide insight into how best to achieve change involving complex innovation and new relationships between patients and clinicians.  Patient expectations are changing rapidly and given the length of time which has elapsed since the UCL research was conducted, along with the recent launch of the information revolution consultation, the Department of Health is committed to discovering current perceptions of how best to improve patient control over their records and shared decision making with clinicians."

regards
Eileen Phillips

Head of Media Relations,
Department of Health Informatics
0207 969 5924
07917 506 531

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