Weather confirms green stance

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Sitting by my oil heater (saving on fuel as there’s bound to be a strike soon) I pondered on how the weather has demonstrated that “Green” is the way to go!

I imagine that you thought green issues have taken a back seat in recent times, with organisations concentrating on cutting costs. But the NHS’ recent announcement that it plans to slash its carbon footprint through virtualisation and cloud computing is a sign that the issue has not disappeared, far from it.

With the government committed to making its IT operations carbon neutral by 2013 we predict that this will be the catalyst for virtualisation being a big growth area in 2009.

We all know the environmental impact that IT is having. IT operations are widely reported to be responsible for something in the region of one billon tonnes of C0² emissions each year.

One of the main benefits of virtualisation is that it can reduce carbon emissions by decreasing the number of physical computer servers. Fewer physical servers mean a smaller electricity bill from the reduced amount of hardware and the fewer cooling systems needed.

Plus the NHS also believes that the greater use of its IP network will play a part in reducing its carbon footprint as teleconferencing and telemedicine become more widely used to reduce the amount of travelling by staff and patients.

So the NHS should be praised for innovation and green leadership, but it’s not just the environment that benefits from creating better systems for home working. Businesses and the greater public can as well.

The recent weather has forced millions of workers to remain at home however, I and many of my colleagues, whose organisations had already invested in mobile networking, were able to carry on work as usual.

However colleagues and companies with no such connectivity were left out, literally in the cold!

I’m sure there are many organisations now that will be taking this as a lesson learnt and start looking to optimise their mobile working systems, otherwise they stand to lose millions more when the next snow storm brings England to a stand still, or when a carbon tax hits the books.