Vendor wars and wide open plains

There have been some pretty big moves in the tech space in the past couple of years as major software and hardware players, like Oracle and HP, continue to expand their proprietary offerings for customers. At the same time, we have companies,...

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There have been some pretty big moves in the tech space in the past couple of years as major software and hardware players, like Oracle and HP, continue to expand their proprietary offerings for customers.

At the same time, we have companies, like salesforce.com, who are building tightly vertical stacks of product (in some cases hardware, software and services), that allow vast ecosystems to spring up around these vertical integrations, fostering economic growth and opportunities for countless developers.

On the other hand, there’s an incredible groundswell of activity around open source in cloud, continuing the legacy of MySQL, Linux and other famous projects. The OpenStack initiative seeks to create am entirely open source cloud stack, starting at the infrastructure level. There are initiatives springing up everywhere to reinvent IT from the ground up by small and large companies.

So who will win the battle for the hearts and minds of the enterprise? My bet is no one...or everyone.

I think that most companies are going to take advantage of open systems wherever possible, because the pace of innovation and ability to contribute (and steer) these projects as they see fit is quickening. And, for some applications or workloads, enterprises are going to use tightly coupled, single brand systems to achieve performance or reliability for certain mission critical applications.

There are many types of dogma being thrown around today in the IT world. Extreme positions are advocated, camps form and reform, but the central point of it all remains: We are at the stage where IT can transform itself and its value to the business.

By rethinking sourcing strategies and focusing on outcomes as opposed to means of production, IT can exhibit cloud-like capabilities and operate with even greater efficiencies and value. It’s not going to be about which philosophy will win, it will be about adopting the best of all worlds to drive high performance.

Blog post by Joe Tobolski, Global Lead of Infrastructure at Accenture Technology Labs

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