Tweetup is in the dictionary, chillax

Tweetup, a meeting arranged through Twitter, is one of more than 2,000 new words and phrases welcomed into the Oxford English Dictionary in its latest edition. This latest edition is compiled from analysis of two billion words in usage, including...

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Tweetup, a meeting arranged through Twitter, is one of more than 2,000 new words and phrases welcomed into the Oxford English Dictionary in its latest edition.

This latest edition is compiled from analysis of two billion words in usage, including analysis of Internet message boards. It’s no surprise that so many Internet terms have been put into the dictionary. Every year we see more and more Internet-related terms make their way into our lexicon. For instance, tweeting, microblogging, paywall and defriend (as in removing a contact on Facebook) have all arrived in our language thanks to the Internet.

However, in my opinion, just because a word is in a dictionary doesn’t make it a ‘real word’. As language evolves, there are always more words in common use than are in the dictionary. But, even if a word is in common use and in the dictionary, it does not mean it will escape the red pen of sub-editors.

The addition of 'tweetup' in particular doesn’t wash with me, as it is based on Twitter, a technology that may or may not exist in a few years. It wasn’t so long ago that the Philip B. Corbett, standards editor at the New York Times, caused a furore in the Web 2.0 world with a strongly-worded memo advising writers to avoid the term ‘tweet’:

“But except for special effect, we try to avoid colloquialisms, neologisms and jargon. ‘Tweet’ — as a noun or a verb — is all three. Yet it has appeared 18 times in articles in the past month, in a range of sections.”
What do you think? What words should be included in the dictionary? What words would you like to see fade from common use?

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Update: Google admits its developers copied rival's software Oxford dictionary recognises 'unfriend'