Oracle's legal wranglings - is it losing focus?

If you haven’t been keeping track, the entire Oracle/ SAP/ HP situation can be a bit hard to keep track of. With that in mind, here’s some thoughts in no particular order which might help you join the dots.For a more detailed rundown,...

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If you haven’t been keeping track, the entire Oracle/ SAP/ HP situation can be a bit hard to keep track of. With that in mind, here’s some thoughts in no particular order which might help you join the dots.

For a more detailed rundown, check out this brilliant summary from our hosts, ComputerworldUK.

SAP in the ring with Oracle

When SAP announced its Q3 they were up on last year, but no where near as spectacular as Oracle’s results. While the arch enemy didn’t officially comment, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison did take to the record claiming he could prove former SAP supremo Leo Apotheker knew SAP subsidiary Tomorrow Now had systematically stolen Oracle data.

With SAP refused a gagging order on the trial, and Apothekernow being called as a witness, it seems further embarrassing revelations may well be on their way. Reputations and damages are now at stake.

SAP caught red-handed?

If Apotheker is found to have approved Tomorrow Now’s use of stolen Oracle Intellectual property, the damages awarded could be astronomical - Oracle is claiming a whopping $2bn. Meanwhile, you can hardly blame SAP for suggesting something a trifle closer to the tens of millions mark.

Leo feels the heat

It’s not great timing for Apotheker who looked ready to make a strong start as CEO of HP, filling the gap left when Mark Hurd was ejected, only to land at Oracle as President. With former Oracle president Ray Lane now in the HP Chairman seat, you can see how this all makes life quite interesting.

Is Oracle getting battle weary?

Oracle will enjoy kicking SAP while it’s down and disrupting HP with the same blow but will be conscious that it is fighting its battles on many fronts. All the while, there’s a simultaneous legal wrangling with Google over the copying of its Java code into Android, as well as its defence against the US Justice Department for overcharging them.

With its business applications, Oracle need to get back to what it does best and make fast progress on its Fusion strategy if it is to take meaningful market share from SAP while pushing the Exadata and Exalogic integrated stack strategy to keep HP at bay.

Real work here will be worth much more than political millions won in lawsuits.

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