Movie piracy as bad as child porn, implies MPA

By Richi Jennings (@richi). Hollywood's Motion Picture Association (MPA) is asking BT to prevent access to Newzbin2, an index of allegedly-pirated content. The MPA -- not to be confused with the MPAA -- is asking the High Court to force BT ...

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By Richi Jennings (@richi).

Hollywood's Motion Picture Association (MPA) is asking BT to prevent access to Newzbin2, an index of allegedly-pirated content. The MPA -- not to be confused with the MPAA -- is asking the High Court to force BT to use its child-porn-blocking-proxies to also block the supposedly-piratical site.

  • On the one hand, it's hard to defend Newzbin and other curated filesharing indices  as simply being like Google.
  • On The Other Hand, it's the thin end of a worrying censorship wedge.

Plus, today's skateboarding duck: CAPTCHA'd!..


Aunty Beeb reports:
In a UK legal first, the ... MPA has applied for an injunction ... to force BT to cut off ... access to Newzbin. ... The industry body for a number of movie studios ... is the international arm of the Motion Picture Association of America. ... [It] wants BT to [use] the same system that stops access to ... child sex abuse images.
...
It brought its action against BT because [it's] the largest ISP in the UK with more than 5.6 million customers ... [and] supplies the site-blocking system known as Cleanfeed to many others. ... Blocks have been used widely throughout Europe but a success [in this case] would mark the first time the tactic has worked in the UK. more.png


Josh Halliday isn't joking:
[It] will be the first [time] an attempt is made ... to block sites under the Copyright, Design and Patents Act.
...
The film industry's fight against Newzbin stretches back to March last year. ... The high court ordered the site to ... pay damages. ... Newzbin Ltd. went into administration shortly after. ... However, a clone site soon [started] operating anonymously from Sweden.
...
Separately, the communications minister, Ed Vaizey, is ... [discussing] setting up a voluntary web blocking body to curb illicit filesharing. more.png


Enigmax channels the defendant:
Cleanfeed is a content blocking system ... operational since 2004 [using] information supplied by the Internet Watch Foundation ... to block child pornography. ... In 2004 by Mike Galvin, then Director of Internet Services for BT Retail ... said that if the pressure to “extend” ... Cleanfeed became too great, BT would cancel the project.
...
“The MPA application to engage in censorship ... would, if granted, set a dangerous precedent. ... ‘Drive-by’ litigation such as this will cut off ... legitimate content and is entirely unwarranted & disproportionate,” concludes Newzbin’s Mr White. more.png


Scott Bicheno too:
With the ... Digital Economy Bill ... set to come into law ... unopposed by the Coalition ... and the judiciary denying the right to appeal it, the current legal climate seems sympathetic to the MPA.
...
Newzbin has always insisted its technology is not designed to infringe copyright, and is merely an indexing and search tool. more.png


Mark Brown is even less even-handed:
The outcome of this trial ... could set an alarming precedent. ... It could allow the entertainment industry to strong-arm ... broadband providers into censoring the internet. ... Other ISPs license [Cleanfeed] or use similar systems -- and are instructed by the government to do so. more.png


And supabof93 is positively incandescent:
No ****ing way. Compulsory filtering of porn is one thing, but when you start ... blocking via injunction, it will never stop. The judge in this case better set the right precedent. more.png



Today's Skateboarding Duck...



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Richi JenningsRichi Jennings is an independent analyst/consultant, specializing in blogging, email, and security. His writing has previously won American Society of Business Publication Editors and Jesse H. Neal awards. A cross-functional IT geek since 1985, you can also read Richi's full profile and disclosure of his industry affiliations.

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