Knowing your anchor vendors

Glenn O’Donnell of Forrester posed an interesting idea in a recent blog post about the term “Anchor Vendors,” that I find consistent with what we have observed in working closely with a large set of enterprise customers and...

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Glenn O’Donnell of Forrester posed an interesting idea in a recent blog post about the term “Anchor Vendors,” that I find consistent with what we have observed in working closely with a large set of enterprise customers and service providers.

An Anchor Vendor is defined as a vendor that provides “end-to-end” IT service solutions for customers to manage the new “Hybrid “IT environment (public cloud, private cloud, internal data centre and more). So why is an Anchor Vendor important today?

IT organisations are going through a massive change driven by new business requirements for agility, and “multi-sourcing” of IT services and technology.

The rapid adoption of cloud services in all its forms (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS) has made delivery and management of IT more complex than ever. In the near future, business processes and services will span applications that are increasingly being delivered across internal and external environments.

Businesses seek to unlock the value of this new “hybrid” environment to become agile and reduce the cost and risk associated with delivering business services. What enables this value realisation is a service management strategy that manages the entire lifecycle of services (regardless of the type) from the planning, to delivery, operation and governance.

In response to the failure of complex IT management frameworks, the last decade has resulted in many IT organisations buying point products to address specific IT operations management needs, often spending time, effort and money integrating a disparate collection of tools.

The use cases needed to support hybrid IT requires a much more evolved approach involving a robust, scalable, IT architecture that is optimised for the new world but can also manage existing physical, and virtual infrastructures.

Perhaps most importantly, given the speed of innovation and the strong desire for organisations to have choices, there is a need to integrate and orchestrate a wide variety of products from multiple suppliers (e.g. hardware, virtualisation, and public clouds).

Below are the most common criteria we have observed through our customers for becoming an “anchor vendor”:

  1. Management of the “entire stack” from business services and application, through to the virtual and physical infrastructure.
  2. Integrated portfolio for managing the entire lifecycle of services (whether on premise or external).
  3. Integration architecture and ability to integrate third-party solutions in a robust and service driven manner.
  4. Ability to preserve the customer’s choice by supporting a multi vendor environment across applications, hypervisors, physical infrastructure and public clouds.
  5. Ability to deliver management capabilities as a service (SaaS, Managed Services, or fully outsourced).

Posted by Kia Behnia, SVP and CTO, BMC Software

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