Stuxent could have caused another Chernobyl, claims Russian diplomat

The Stuxnet worm attack known to have struck computers at the Russian-built Iranian Bushehr nuclear plant in Iran has serious implications and could have caused "another Chernobyl," a Russian ambassador is said to have advised NATO yesterday, according to a Reuters report.

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The Stuxnet worm attack known to have struck computers at the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear plant in Iran has serious implications, and could have caused "another Chernobyl," a Russian ambassador is said to have advised NATO yesterday, according to a Reuters report.

The Reuters report says Dmitry Rogozin, Russia's ambassador to NATO, called the Stuxnet virus "very toxic, very dangerous" and said it had caused centrifuges to spin out of control. It was dangerous enough to have possibly caused "a new Chernobyl," an allusion to the devastating nuclear plant accident in the mid-1980s in Ukraine.

According to Reuters, Rogozin said NATO should investigate the Stuxnet matter.

Security experts have spent considerable time examining Stuxnet code, with many regarding it as weaponised malware that was likely used by an enemy of Iran to slow down development of its nuclear programme. Some sources believe that Israel or the US may have had a stealthy hand in Stuxnet's creation.

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