Storage revolution shuffling IT jobs

The growing flood of data that enterprises create and consume is doing more than giving rise to new storage technologies. It's also changing who is responsible for storage within IT departments.

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The growing flood of data that enterprises create and consume is doing more than giving rise to new storage technologies. It's also changing who is responsible for storage within IT departments.

Demand for storage capacity has grown by 60% per year and shows no signs of slowing down, according to research company IDC. New disclosure laws, which require more data to be preserved and retrievable, also are making storage management a bigger job.

Now, with network-attached storage, storage-area networks (SAN), virtualisation and other technologies shifting information and processing around within enterprises, a variety of changes are happening in the storage administration ranks.

"With the sheer complexity of some companies' information infrastructures, you wonder whether one person can really get their hands around it all," says Pund-IT analyst Charles King. The job has grown beyond taking care of storage arrays, he says. "It's really requiring storage administrators and executives, including CIOs, to think of it in a more holistic way."

The turning point for some IT departments seems to be the shift to centralised storage. Late last year, the University of Pittsburgh set up its first SAN and started moving its data out of servers and into its network operations centre, says Jinx Walton, director of IT. Until then, every time a group in the IT department set out to meet a need on campus, the university's IT development team would assess how much storage was needed for the project and purchase it. The individual group would then manage that storage.

"Whoever was responsible for the project was responsible for the storage," Walton says.

But that was inefficient. Buying storage for individual servers and investing in additional disks when the servers filled up was expensive and a distraction, she says. After centralising most servers in the network operations centre (NOC), the university started building a SAN there and that was shared by all the project managers. Purchasing and management of storage shifted from the development realm to the NOC. It wasn't easy at first, Walton says.

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