Hyperconverged systems market takes off, says analyst IDC

VDI projects remain the most common workload within this market, but the number of general business applications running on hyperconverged systems increased steadily throughout 2014.

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Industry analyst IDC estimates the global hyperconverged systems market grew 162 percent in 2014 to a market value of $373 million, but this year the figure is expected to jump to $807 million (£538 million).

Hyperconverged systems are an infrastructure system with a software-centric architecture which tightly integrates storage, networking and virtualisation resources. By the end of 2014, said IDC, nearly two dozen companies had entered, or announced their intention to enter the hyperconverged systems market. 

“This has set the stage for another year of strong market growth”, said IDC. According to a new forecast, sales of hyperconverged systems in 2015 will generate $807 million in global revenue - up 116 percent over 2014.

Hyperconverged systems found early success within mid-sized environments and virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) projects, due largely to their ability to eliminate the complexity, expense and latency often associated with SAN-based storage solutions.

The mix of workloads running on these solutions though is “changing rapidly”, said IDC. VDI projects remain the most common workload within this market, but the number of general business applications running on hyperconverged systems increased steadily throughout 2014.

The workload mix within the market is expected to diversify even further throughout the forecast period as organisations expand their use of these systems within the data centre, IDC said.

"Just like today's IT departments, the integrated systems market is rapidly evolving," said Eric Sheppard, an IDC analyst. "These systems are helping to deliver many of the proven benefits of integrated systems - including reduced complexity, risk and inefficiencies - into new environments with targeted infrastructure needs or smaller budgets.”