Computing pioneer Alan Turing papers saved

A collection of computer scientist Alan Turing’s papers has been saved from export.

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A collection of computer scientist Alan Turing’s papers has been saved from export.

One of the founders of modern computing and a key member of the World War 2 Bletchley Park code breakers, Turing’s paper have been saved thanks to a donation from  the National Fund.

The papers were given to Max Newman, a long-time collaborator and colleague at Bletchley Park whose pioneered work on mechanising code-breaking.

In 1952, when Turing was put on trial for homosexuality, which was then illegal, Newman spoke in Turing’s defence. The conviction Turing received was followed by withdrawal of his security clearance and his subsequent suicide.

The campaign to save the papers attracted thousands of pounds of public money and a pledge from Google of $100,000.

Simon Greenish, chief executive of the Bletchley Park Trust, said “The acquisition of this hugely important collection has been made possible only by the astonishing support demonstrated by the public, the media, Google, the National Heritage Memorial Fund and Christies the auctioneers, whose help in brokering the purchase is gratefully acknowledged. “

Bletchley Park said, The Turing-Newman Collaboration Collection will be on display in the Museum later this year, once conservation work on the collection is complete.

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