Stealing company data? It is just an insurance policy

Four out of ten office workers have taken sensitive company data from their employers to a new job and almost half would steal data as an “insurance policy” in tough economic times.

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Four out of ten office workers have taken sensitive company data from their employers to a new job and almost half would steal data as an “insurance policy” in tough economic times.

A survey of 600 office workers in Canary Wharf London and Wall Street in New York for Cyber-Ark Software, suggested a significant change in workplace ethics over the past year of economic crisis.

Almost half (48 percent) of those surveyed said if they were fired tomorrow they would take company information with them and 39 percent would download company/competitive information if their job was at risk.

Of these, 64% will do so “just in case” it proves useful in the future, 27% would use it to negotiate their new position, while 20% plan to use it as a tool in their new job.

Customer and contact details were most sought after (29%), followed plans and proposals (18%), with 13% planning to take access and password codes that would allow them access to information even after they had left.

"While there is no excuse for employees who are willing to compromise their ethics to save their job, much of the responsibility for protecting sensitive proprietary data falls on the employer," said Adam Bosnian, vice president of products and strategy, Cyber-Ark Software.

"Organisations must be willing to make improvements to how they monitor and control access to databases, networks and systems - even by those privileged users who have legitimate rights."

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