Ministry of Justice requires £25m worth of protective monitoring services

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) is seeking a new provider to supply it with protective monitoring services, worth up to £25 million, as part of its extensive Future IT Sourcing Programme (FITS), which will replace or renew all of its major ICT contracts.

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The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) is seeking a new provider to supply it with protective monitoring services, worth up to £25 million, as part of its extensive Future IT Sourcing Programme (FITS), which will replace or renew all of its major ICT contracts.

The FITS programme is organised into service towers, a preferred approach amongst government departments in recent months, which allows for the MoJ to set up ‘towers’ that provide different services – such as desktops, networks, applications – across the whole organisation.

It is hoped that the MoJ will save approximately £100 million over the next three to five years in ICT costs by replacing or renewing all of its contracts under the FITS programme.

The MoJ has said: “Whilst the project will not mandate exactly how this capability should be delivered, it is anticipated that it will involve the deployment of equipment and software into other Tower environments, connectivity with these environments, and process interaction with other Tower providers as well as the MoJ.

“Protective monitoring will be deployed to areas of MoJ’s ICT estate where it can achieve the most value.”

All government departments are mandated to comply with policy, standard, legislative and regulatory requirements. Protective monitoring, through the use of log management and reporting, can help in forensic assessment, incident management and delivering on regulatory requirements to provide evidence of compliance to auditors.

The MoJ has said it intends to invite a minimum of five, and a maximum of eight, vendors to tender for the work. The anticipated length of the contract is a minimum of three years, with the option to extend by another four years.

In other news, the MoJ recently put out a call for digital jobseekers to apply to work with the department’s newly formed digital services division to help transform its public services into online products.

It said that every year nine million people come into contact with the justice system, using ‘some of the most complex services in government’, and if the department is going to provide digital access to these services, it needs good people.

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