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gTLD applications - Tech giants lead grab for new domains

Google and Amazon spend millions to bet on names like BUY, GAME and SHOP

Dozens of popular high-tech brands - from Acer and Apple to Yahoo and YouTube - are staking their claims in the internet's latest land grab by applying for their company and product names as well as generic terms as new domain name extensions. All of these companies do business online today through the .com top-level domain (TLD). But if their applications are approved, these high-tech companies may choose to migrate their websites to domain name extensions they operate and control, such as .acer or .apple. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has released the list of 1,900 applications that it has received for new TLDs. Keep clicking to see which tech brands are betting millions of dollars, at $185,000 per application, on new domain names.

Google

Through its subsidiary Charleston Road Registry, Google has applied for 98 names in English:

ADS, AND, ANDROID, APP, ARE, BABY, BLOG, BOO, BOOK, BUY, CAL, CAR, CHANNEL, CHROME, CLOUD, CORP, CPA, DAD, DAY, DCLK, DDS, DEV, DIY, DOCS, DOG, DOT, DRIVE, EARTH, EAT, ESQ, EST, FAMILY, FILM, FLY, FOO, FREE, FUN, FYI, GAME, GBIZ, GLE, GMAIL, GMBH, GOO, GOOG, GOOGLE, GUGE, HANGOUT, HERE, HOME, HOW, INC, ING, KID, LIVE, LLC, LLP, LOL, LOVE, MAIL, MAP, MBA, MED, MEME, MOM, MOTO, MOV, MOVIE, MUSIC, NEW, NEXUX, PAGE, PET, PHD, PLAY, PLUS, PROD, PROF, RSVP, SEARCH, SHOP, SHOW, SITE, SOY, SPOT, SRL, STORE, TALK, TEAM, TECH, TOUR, TUBE, VIP, WEB, WOW, YOU, YOUTUBE AND ZIP.

Plus another three in non-English character sets. Google spent $18.7 million on applications alone.

Amazon

Amazon submitted applications for 65 domain name strings:

AMAZON, APP, AUDIBLE, AUTHOR, AWS, BOOK, BOT, BOX, BUY, CALL, CIRCLE, CLOUD, COUPON, DEAL, DEV, DRIVE, FAST, FIRE, FREE, GAME, GOT, GROUP, HOT, IMDB, JOT, JOY, KIDS, KINDLE, LIKE, MAIL, MAP, MOBILE, MOI, MOVIE, MUSIC, NEWS, NOW, PAY, PIN, PLAY, PRIME, READ, ROOM, SAFE, SAVE, SEARCH, SECURE, SHOP, SHOW, SILK, SMILE, SONG, SPOT, STORE, TALK, TUNES, TUSHU, VIDEO, WANGGOU, WOW, YAMAXUN, YOU, YUN, ZAPPOS and ZERO.

With 10 additional non-English language domain name strings, Amazon's applications cost the e-commerce firm around $13.9 million.

Microsoft

Microsoft also was active in the domain name land grab, submitting applications for 11 domain name strings around its product lines:

AZURE, BING, DOCS, HOTMAIL, LIVE, MICROSOFT, OFFICE, SKYDRIVE, SKYPE, WINDOWS and XBOX.

These applications cost Microsoft just over $2 million.

Symantec

Symantec applied for six English language character strings, including both product names and generic terms:

ANTIVIRUS, CLOUD, NORTON, PROTECTION, SECURITY and SYMANTEC.

Symantec's application fees topped $1.1 million.

Sony

Sony took a more conservative approach, applying for just three domain name strings related to its brand names:

PLAYSTATION, SONY and XPERIA.

The ICANN application fee for these three names is $555,000.

Yahoo

Yahoo applied for two domain name strings:

FLICKR and YAHOO.

Total investment for these applications: $370,000.

Comcast

Comcast also registered for two domain name strings:

COMCAST and XFINITY.

The company's application fees ran $370,000.

Oracle

Another conservative investor in the new top-level domain arena was Oracle, which applied for:

JAVA and ORACLE.

Total fees paid to ICANN for these two names were $370,000.

Intel

Intel also took a conservative position on new domain name, registering just two options:

INTEL and ULTRABOOK.

This resulted in application fees of $370,000.

Nokia

Nokia was one of the few multinational corporations that took advantage of internationalised domain names, which are domain name strings in non-English language character sets. The Finnish mobile phone company registered for its own name in English and in Chinese character sets.

Total payments to ICANN for these applications: $370,000.

Names alone

Dozens of big-name tech firms chose to apply only for new top-level domains in their company name. If these applications are approved, the internet will feature many new domain name extensions including:

ACER, APPLE, BROTHER, CANON, DELL, CISCO, EPSON, ERICSSON, FUJITSU, HITACHI, HONEYWELL, IBM,INTUIT, JUNIPER, NETFLIX, PANASONIC, SAP and XEROX.

  • Google
  • Amazon
  • Microsoft
  • Symantec
  • Sony
  • Yahoo
  • Comcast
  • Oracle
  • Intel
  • Nokia
  • Names alone
  • Play
  • Play
  • Backward
  • Forward

Dozens of popular high-tech brands - from Acer and Apple to Yahoo and YouTube - are staking their claims in the internet's latest land grab by applying for their company and product names as well as generic terms as new domain name extensions. All of these companies do business online today through the .com top-level domain (TLD). But if their applications are approved, these high-tech companies may choose to migrate their websites to domain name extensions they operate and control, such as .acer or .apple. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has released the list of 1,900 applications that it has received for new TLDs. Keep clicking to see which tech brands are betting millions of dollars, at $185,000 per application, on new domain names.

Dozens of popular high-tech brands - from Acer and Apple to Yahoo and YouTube - are staking their claims in the internet's latest land grab by applying for their company and product names as well as generic terms as new domain name extensions. All of these companies do business online today through the .com top-level domain (TLD). But if their applications are approved, these high-tech companies may choose to migrate their websites to domain name extensions they operate and control, such as .acer or .apple. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has released the list of 1,900 applications that it has received for new TLDs. Keep clicking to see which tech brands are betting millions of dollars on new domain names.

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