The best Apple ads during the Steve Jobs age

Apple's best TV commercials over the last three decades

1984: The launch of the first Macintosh

Inspired by "hate" scenes from the film 1984 (based on George Orwell's novel about a dystopian society controlled by Big Brother), this ad sees Apple as being the saviour that brings the world freedom in computing from the rigid control of existing market leaders, who are brainwashing the masses.

1999: iMac G3

Skip ahead 15 years to when Jobs came back in the driving seat, for the launch of the multi-coloured iMac G3s, which were the originators of legacy-free personal computing.

1999: Hal 2001 Apple Macintosh

At the height of the Y2K paranoia over computers failing at the stroke of the millennium, Apple decided to launch a spoof commercial inspired by the cult 1968 Stanley Kubrick science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey, complete with the voice of Hal 9000.

2001: iMac G4 - Window Shopping

Nicknamed the "iLamp" and advertised as having the flexibility of a desk lamp, the iMac G4 featured in an advertisement trying to imitate British actor Don Gilet (Eastenders, Dr Who).

2003: PowerBook G4

Between 2001 - 2003, Apple launched the Titanium PowerBook G4, a series of notebook computers famed for their slim-lined design, long battery life and processing power.

2004: iPod and Jet

In 2001 the first iPod was launched, but one of the most iconic iPod ads came out in 2004. The ad featured dancers silhouetted against multi-coloured backgrounds, grooving in time on iPods to Jet's "Are you gonna be my girl?".

2006: Get a Mac undefined Out of the Box

From May 2006 to October 2009, Apple ran the hilarious "Get a Mac" campaign. Featuring 66 TV spots in the US and 15 in the UK, the ads used human interaction to show the differences between PCs and Macs and why Macs were far superior. Out of the Box stars comedian John Hodgman and actor Justin Long (of Jeepers Creepers and Ed fame), who reprised their roles for the entire campaign.

2007 Get a Mac - Office Posse

In the UK, the ads were recast, starring popular British comedy duo Mitchell and Webb. Famed for their contrasting characters in Peepshow, David Mitchell played stodgy Mac-hating PC, while Robert Webb played the cool Mac. Seven ads were created specifically for the UK market, such as Office Posse.

2007: iPhone

In 2007, Apple launched its teaser trailer for the brand new iPhone during the Academy Awards. This ad featured clips from numerous famous films and TV shows through history to show the importance of the phone.

2009: Get a Mac - Broken Promises

One of the very last ads in the Get a Mac campaign, this ad is particularly memorable because it goes through the years and shows Justin Long and John Hodgman as the ever-changing PC and Mac, but with PC always promising to have a better operating system than before.

2011: The iPad 2 - Just beginning

One of the latest ads from Apple, this TV spot features the new iPad 2 and the ever-growing numbers of ways it can be used. To Apple, this is only the beginning.

  • 1984: The launch of the first Macintosh
  • 1999: iMac G3
  • 1999: Hal 2001 Apple Macintosh
  • 2001: iMac G4 - Window Shopping
  • 2003: PowerBook G4
  • 2004: iPod and Jet
  • 2006: Get a Mac undefined Out of the Box
  • 2007 Get a Mac - Office Posse
  • 2007: iPhone
  • 2009: Get a Mac - Broken Promises
  • 2011: The iPad 2 - Just beginning
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1984: The launch of the first Macintosh

Inspired by "hate" scenes from the film 1984 (based on George Orwell's novel about a dystopian society controlled by Big Brother), this ad sees Apple as being the saviour that brings the world freedom in computing from the rigid control of existing market leaders, who are brainwashing the masses.

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