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What if tech companies owned the Wonders of the World?

What the Acropolis, Mount Rushmore and others might look like if bought out by tech companies.

Behold the wonder of the Micropolis!

The Micropolis, Greece

Since Greece is likely the first country that will go under, it only makes sense that it will sell its most prized landmark to Microsoft, one of the world's most powerful tech companies. Microsoft is likely to put its own unique stamp on the Acropolis by installing windows in between its columns that will be painted the same primary colors as its Windows logo. For history's sake, however, you have to hope that the Acropolis doesn't crash as often as Vista did.

The iFfel Tower, France

What an insult to the French! Not only do they sell their most famous building, but they sell it to an American company! Converting the Eiffel Tower to the iFfel Tower would not only be Steve Jobs' greatest vanity project, but it would be the largest slap to French sensibilities since the opening of Euro Disneyland.Don't get too smug, though, because America will have to make a significant sacrifice as well, as the next slide will demonstrate

Mount Rushdork, United States

Apologies to Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and Roosevelt. You were fine presidents and all, but our national debt has forced us to take down your likenesses from Mount Rushmore and replace them with those of our corporate overlords: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Eric Schmidt and Michael Dell. After all, while the original guys might have given us the Constitution, the Louisiana Purchase, the abolition of slavery and our national parks, they never gave us anything as cool as the iPhone.

Cisco Itza, Mexico

Ah, the ancient wonder of the Chichen Itza, the Central American pyramid that served as a center of Mayan civilization. Thankfully there aren't any ancient Mayans around today to see their treasured wonder sold off to Cisco, which proceeded to build a companion pyramid next to the old one to make the landmark look more like Cisco's "suspension bridge" logo.

The Great Firewall of McAfee, China

The Great Wall of China is the only manmade structure that can be seen from outer space. This makes it the perfect marketing tool for McAfee to use to promote its security software to the entire galaxy.

The Dellosseum, Italy

Yes, Dell is perfectly happy to defile this Ancient Roman landmark by placing a giant crooked "E" in the middle of it. But on the plus side, Dell could use the Colosseum as the ideal setting to rectify its past mistakes by throwing the Dell Dude to the lions...

The Great Pyramid of Google, Egypt

Think you're paranoid about Google's data collection practices today? Just wait until they move their official headquarters to the Great Pyramid of Giza and paint a giant eyeball on the top of it. The world's largest search engine combined with Illuminati symbolism? It's a paranoid's absolute worst nightmare!

What other landmarks should go up for sale? Think that AT&T will make a play for Big Ben? Or that Motorola will place bids on the Louvre? Let us know in the comments!

  • Behold the wonder of the Micropolis!
  • The Micropolis, Greece
  • The iFfel Tower, France
  • Mount Rushdork, United States
  • Cisco Itza, Mexico
  • The Great Firewall of McAfee, China
  • The Dellosseum, Italy
  • The Great Pyramid of Google, Egypt
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Behold the wonder of the Micropolis!

Greece's sovereign debt crisis led at one point for calls on the Greek government to sell its famed Acropolis in order to pay off its expenses. But now that it looks like other Eurozone nations could be facing similar crises in the near future, we expect to see calls for other famous landmarks to be sold off as well.

And this got us thinking: Who would be rich enough to buy all these things? Certainly some of the tech industry's biggest players would qualify, such as Microsoft, Google and Apple. In this slideshow, we'll take a look into a future where broke governments are forced to sell their most treasured landmarks to the world's richest nerds. Because really, who wouldn't want to see Steve Jobs replace Thomas Jefferson on Mount Rushmore?

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