LulzSec's final act - releases data from AT&T, AOL and NATO

LulzSec's final act - releases data from AT&T, AOL and NATO

Heavy weight data dump from hacker group that has called it a day

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LulzSec , the hacker group that has been a thorn in the side of major institutions ranging from Sony to the CIA, has not gone quietly.

Instead it has released a variety of documents, including what appears to be purloined data from AT&T, AOL, the US Navy, NATO, a private investigation firm, the FBI and several gaming sites.

By far, the largest data trove was a compressed file containing nearly 600 MB of internal AT&T data. The group also obtained what it says are a technical note from AOL; user names and passwords for employees of the investigative firm Priority Investigations; 12,000 user credentials from a NATO bookshop run by a third-party; more than half a million logins for the online game Battlefield Heroes Beta; 200,000 user names and passwords from Hackforums.net; and a screenshot showing a defacement of a U.S. Navy job board.

The final hacker trove also included a variety of other data from gamer sites and corporate networks, according to online chatter and an index of the data posted by LulzSec.

It's not clear how much of the hacked data is genuine, but several organizations have already posted notices admitting to security compromises. NATO issued a statement saying it had been alerted to a "probable data breach from a NATO-related website operated by an external company." The site for Battlefield Heroes said it was investigating "an apparent security breach." AT&T declined to comment, while AOL was unavailable for comment.

Since May, LulzSec has carried out server raids and website attacks against a variety of targets including Fox.com, the US Senate, the CIA, Sony, the UK Serious Organised Crime Agency, the Arizona Department of Public Safety and PBS.

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