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Oracle nominates Brazilian Java group for JCP

Oracle nominates Brazilian Java group for JCP

SouJava up for committee spot left vacant by Apache Foundation

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Oracle has nominated Brazilian user group SouJava to fill the vacancy left by the Apache Software Foundation on the Java SE/EE executive committee.

SouJava will be represented by Bruno Souza, a well known figure in the Java community, according to a blog post late Monday by JCP chairman Patrick Curran.

The JCP oversees the development of the Java standard. In December, the ASF resigned from the committee due to what it considered unreasonable control of Java by Oracle. While Oracle subsequently asked the ASF to reconsider, its nomination of SouJava appears to have superseded that request.

SouJava would take up one of three vacant seats that will be filled in an upcoming special election, Curran wrote. It is one of the world's largest Java user groups, counting some 40,000 members, he added.

"Bruno has been a passionate supporter of open source and of Java from its earliest days, and he would be a great asset to the Executive Committee, particularly as we work over the coming year to modify the organisation's processes as we move into its second decade," Curran said.

Overall, Brazil should have a presence on the board, given it is "a major user of Java in both the private and the public sector," Curran added. Souza could not immediately be reached for comment Tuesday.

SouJava's nomination drew praise from Simon Phipps, former chief open source officer at Sun Microsystems, where Java was first developed.

"A very astute move by Oracle here," Phipps wrote on his personal blog. "I think that given the circumstances this is the best outcome that could have been achieved and I hope Bruno and SouJava will be able to use their new position of influence to fix the broken things."

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