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Industry standards consortium The Open Group is partnering with other organisations to develop standards for criticial systems used in aerospace, transportation, communications and other industries.

Industry standards consortium The Open Group is partnering with other organisations to develop standards for criticial systems used in aerospace, transportation, communications and other industries.

Supported by the European Commission, the Distributed MILS for Dependable Information and Communication Infrastructures (D-MILS) project is investing more than €3.8 million (£3.45 million) to develop a scalable architecture that automates the verification of critical distributed systems, and substantially increase system dependability.

The Open Group said the supplier-independent architecture will incorporate newly designed components that provide "added predictability and reliability essential for critical distributed applications", along with new tools "delivering improvements in developer productivity, system verification costs and lower costs for maintenance".

The Distributed MILS technologies will make it possible to automate and substantially lower the certification costs for complex critical applications, including in cloud computing and big data analytics, The Open Group said.

The D-MILS consortium includes Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Université Joseph Fourier, RWTH Aachen University, the University of York, LynuxWorks, TTTech, Frequentis and fortiss.

“The D-MILS project brings together experts addressing each of the technologies required for creating a distributed architecture that is predictable, dependable and fully certifiable for complex critical applications,” said David Lounsbury, chief technical officer at The Open Group.

He said results from the D-MILS project will support systems architects, developers, integrators and operators, by "providing greater assurance that many of the sources of errors that lead to added cost and dangerous failures of critical systems are eliminated”.

The D-MILS project will run until autumn 2015.