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Reed swaps PCs for thin client in green push

Reed swaps PCs for thin client in green push

Jobs firm has 95% of end-users on thin client – and counting

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Recruitment firm Reed has moved most of its staff from PCs onto thin client terminals as it bids to become carbon neutral.

The company, which has around 300 high street recruitment offices across the UK, has moved more than 95% of its 5,000 end-users onto thin client terminals in the past year and is aiming boost that to 98% at least, since most of its remaining PC-using staff could make the transition. The decision to move to thin client was taken during a technology refresh last year.

REED EMPLOYMENT – AT A GLANCE

5,000 IT users

300 branches

IT department – 30 main staff and 30 developers

Main software: Microsoft Windows, NetApp, Lotus Notes, and Oracle 11.i

VMware virtualisation

64 bit AMD-based HP blade servers

Using Wyse V30 thin client

Reed is using Wyse V30 as its thin client, connected to 64 bit HP blade servers. Around 50 blades are in use, with a hundred users to each unit. NetApp software is being used to centralise the data.

Right from the start of the PC-to-thin client migration cost savings have been significant, the company said. Per work station, Reed is using 17.2 watts of power each day on average, against 180 watts per PC. This 90% reduction in usage was made all the more dramatic by the fact that PCs were being left on overnight to enable security updates, whereas the thin client terminals are only on for 50 hours per week on average.

Reed is also attempting to generate some of its own electricity through renewable means, known as microgeneration, said IT head Sean Whetstone.

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