Logica cuts printing to help halve carbon emissions target

Logica cuts printing to help halve carbon emissions target

Uses HP's managed print services

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IT outsourcing firm Logica UK says it is making progress in its aim to reduce its carbon footprint by 50 percent by 2020, with the help of controlling its print emissions.

With 6,000 print users across 23 UK locations, Logica said controlling and managing printing is a key plank to achieving its green targets.

To reduce power usage and cut costs, the service provider implemented a managed print services system from HP. This has helped eliminate many personal printers and has supported the introduction of multifunction printers (MFP) that can print, copy, scan and fax through one device.

These measures have meant that printing has fallen from 16 million prints in 2006 to 9.7 million in 2011, a reduction of 65 percent. Subsequent carbon emissions related to paper have fallen from 407 tonnes in 2006 to 133 tonnes in 2011.

Arlette Anderson, UK head of health, safety and environment at Logica, said: “This has been a long-term initiative and by printing more efficiently HP has helped us realise the significant cost and business benefits that can be made. We still have a long way to go but believe we will achieve our overall 50 percent carbon reduction target.”

The use of remote management and economical "sleep" and "wake-up" times for systems has also enabled Logica to achieve a 32 percent reduction in energy usage for document printing.

In other recent corporate carbon reduction news international food group Danone brought in SAP to enable it to measure its envirionmental footprint using a bespoke reporting platform. Danone, whose brands include Activia, Volvic, Evian, Shape, Actimel and Badoit, set an ambitious goal in 2008 of a 30 percent global carbon footprint reduction by 2012 across its entire supply chain.

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