We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Google to open London centre for start-ups

Google to open London centre for start-ups

Entrepreneurs will have a new space in the capital's Tech City

Article comments

Search giant Google is planning to open a new building dedicated to start-ups in east London's Tech City.

Matt Brittin, VP for northern and central Europe at Google, announced the opening of the seven-storey 'Campus' site at the Digital London conference today, but said that more details about the plans for the building would not be available for another few weeks.

He said that the company will be working with Tech City organisations such as Tech Hub, Springboard, the mentorship-led accelerator program for start-ups, and micro seed fund Seedcamp, to work out how to support entrepreneurs using the building. 

"[We will look at running] events and education, trying a lot of things and finding out what makes the biggest impact," said Brittin.

Depending on the success of Campus, Google will consider opening more start-up centres in other countries, he added.

As well as revealing its plan for start-ups, Google was keen to highlight its commitment to SMEs in the UK, by encouraging them to use the internet to help run and grow their businesses.

In 2010, the company found that there were 1.5 million small businesses without websites. It has since helped more than 220,000 businesses to set up websites through its Getting British Business Online initiative.

SMEs using the internet can increase their export revenues significantly, compared to firms that do not, Brittin said.

He added: "Businesses that are using the internet for marketing are growing at eight times faster than those that don't." 

Share:

Comments

Advertisement
Advertisement
Send to a friend

Email this article to a friend or colleague:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the recipient know who sent the story, and in case of transmission error. Both your name and the recipient's name and address will not be used for any other purpose.


ComputerworldUK Knowledge Vault

ComputerworldUK
Share
x
Open
* *