We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Half of businesses don’t know environmental impact of data centre

Half of businesses don’t know environmental impact of data centre

Data centre managers are unaware despite introduction of Carbon Reduction Commitment

Article comments

A survey of 100 CIOs and data centre managers in the UK has shown that 53 percent of respondents do not know the environmental impact of their own data centres.

The survey was conducted by researchers Vanson Bourne on behalf of data centre infrastructure management solutions provider nlyte Software.

“They’re not aware that the data centre is a hungry user [of energy] because they don’t measure and monitor their business, so they’re unable to identify it,” said Rob Neave, co-founder and VP of IT and sustainability at nlyte Software.

Although the majority (62 percent) of businesses said that increased legislation, like the Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy Efficiency Scheme, would influence them to re-evaluate their data centre’s green policy, a fifth of respondents said they would not. Eighteen percent did not know if they would.

The findings may be seen as surprising given the introduction of the mandatory CRC scheme earlier this year, which aims to reduce the amount of electricity used by businesses – most of which is expended in the data centre.

Nonetheless, companies in financial services were most likely (76 percent) to re-think their green policies, followed by 64 percent in manufacturing. Financial services were also least likely to not re-evaluate (12 percent) their environmental policy due to legislative pressure.

“Financial services seem to be ahead of the game in terms of green,” said Marina Stedman, director of EMEA marketing at nlyte Software. “They’re always leaders in investment in technology.”

Most respondents (36 percent) measure their data centre’s carbon footprint from energy bills, while 21 percent did not know how it was measured. Eighteen percent measured it from carbon emissions.

Neave said: “Most data centre managers claim to measure their data centre’s carbon footprint with regular energy bills, but this is a completely inadequate method of measurement.”

He believes that if businesses cannot measure, monitor and therefore predict their energy usage, they will not be able to pass on the costs of carbon emissions onto their customers –something that 30 percent of respondents said they would do.

APC, the data centre manufacturers, recently said that a new phenomenon called dynamic power variation was severely affecting the efficiency of data centres, and that it would be a worsening problem unless it was addressed soon with new cooling methods.

Share:

Comments

  • Guest And once you actually get a handle on the carbon footprint of your data centre which you have to do for CRC the next thing data centre managers face is the bizarre behaviours that the CRC tax plans will encourage The year on year carbon reduction requirements will tend as one IT director told me recently to force companies to hold back some of the potential gains so that they can put them in place in the following year With the roughly 10 increase in power costs attributable to CRC I suspect that this whole debacle will significantly increase the amount of data centres being located offshore to places like Iceland and outside the reach of the CRC
Advertisement
Send to a friend

Email this article to a friend or colleague:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the recipient know who sent the story, and in case of transmission error. Both your name and the recipient's name and address will not be used for any other purpose.


ComputerworldUK Knowledge Vault

ComputerworldUK
Share
x
Open
* *