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bet365 uses private cloud for new in-play betting system

bet365 uses private cloud for new in-play betting system

Scalable cloud platform helps reduce data latency to less than two seconds

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Online gambling company bet365 has launched its latest in-play betting system, delivered for the first time by its VMware-based private cloud.

According to the company, the vFabric private cloud frees up its databases and storage systems so that they can respond to the demands of the in-play betting.

In-play betting allows punters to place bets during a match or event. To enable this, the system needs to deliver real-time information to customers, while at the same time receiving and processing incoming customer data.

bet365 said that its in-house software development team has designed the push technology to get the data out to customer’s dashboards in near real-time, as well as the software to store information in the cloud. It also said that information on the dashboard is automatically refreshed without interfering with the user’s experience.

The system can handle thousands of changes per second, according to bet365. Furthermore, the data latency has been reduced to less than two seconds. The company’s CTO, Martin Davies previously told Computerworld UK that bet365 aims to have a latency period of just two seconds between changes being made on its systems and for those changes to be seen by the customer.

“Our systems teams have enabled us to take the pressure off our databases and storage systems and increase the scale and flexibility of our systems through the creation of our own personal cloud,” Davies said.

The fourth version of the in-play betting system is built with Flash technology, and bet365 said it is more customisable and has more features than earlier versions.

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