Over a quarter of adults regret not going into IT

Over a quarter of adults regret not going into IT

However, a possible lack of skills is holding people back

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Over a quarter of UK adults (28 percent) wish they had pursued a career in technology, according to new research.

The study, which polled 1,000 adults across the UK, revealed that 44 percent would have liked to have worked in technology for the "expected money", 41 percent for the "intellectual challenge" and 30 percent because a career in technology would have "provided them with more job opportunities".

The study revealed that Brits see technology as an aspirational career choice, with 32 percent saying they wished they worked in the technology industry for the "opportunity to shape the future" and 16 percent because they thought it would enable them to work on things that would have "a real impact on society".

However, a possible lack of skills is holding people back because 45 percent of those who would like to work in technology are not doing so because "they don’t have a degree in IT", 20 percent feel it is "too competitive", 41 percent feel that they are "too old" to change careers, and 13 percent feel the industry is "too male dominated".

The One Poll research was commissioned by Expedia group company Hotels.com.

Stuart Silberg, VP of technology at Hotels.com, said, "It’s important for people to understand that while a technology-related degree is important, it isn’t always essential.

“What’s more important is that a tech skill-set is combined with great communication skills, problem solving abilities and a real passion for the industry."

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